What are your tips for raising and documenting the rigor in your program?


By Nina Crutchfield

I’m guilty.

There, I’ve said it.

“I did not become an ag teacher to teach English, math or social studies. I became an ag teacher to teach kids about agriculture.” I was a fairly young teacher then. Since that time, I hope I’ve grown wiser and understand the reality of our job. It is our job to teach kids as much as possible while we have them, and that includes how to read and comprehend, how to write, how to problem solve and how to see the world around them in a larger context. These are the skills the entire educational system, which we are a part of, works so hard to provide our students. We just happen to do it all using the context of agriculture.

What are your tips for raising and documenting the rigor in your program?
I might have done a better job earlier in my career if I’d have had access to your tips. Share what you are doing to impact your students’ performance in their academic courses and on standardized tests. Post your thoughts, practices and ideas on naae’s communities of practice. Today, more than ever, we have to document our impact and begin sharing our story of that impact.

This issue of making a difference shares how instructors are using their FFA activities to enhance and document the rigor of their classroom. It also highlights FFA efforts to connect career development events and applications to academic content standards, all in an effort to document our impact and share our story.‚Äč